A stroll and a spring steam gala (19/03/17)

I can remember the dying days of steam on our railway network, and I’m glad that preservation has safeguarded some remnants of those times for the benefit and enjoyment of generations present and future. That said, I don’t quite share the almost evangelical zeal exhibited by some; and here’s the real heresy – I actually prefer the old diesels!

But sometimes, we just happen to be in the vicinity of the Severn Valley when there’s a gala day and there’s no denying the old steamers can be very photogenic. Here’s former BR Standard Class 92214 working its way through The Wyre Forest near to the old mining villages of Highley and Alveley.  Built at Swindon works during 1959, it had a short operational life – being withdrawn from service in 1965. At various times it has carried the names: Oliver Cromwell; Leicester City; Central Star; Cock o’ The North, and possibly some others besides…

Here it is again, later in the day, waiting and then just departing the station at Bewdley; by this time the header code and other adornments had been removed…

A member of the station staff is about to hand the single line running token to the driver…

Also pictured at Bewdley, an old Great Western saddle tank – a shunting engine built primarily for dockside workings and use in colliery sidings. Here it’s just running around a short train at the northern end of the station…

  The same engine photographed side-on at Highley station yard…

A couple of shots taken at Hampton Loade station: the top one is of a GWR 1400 class tank engine, just about to depart on a shuttle service to Bridgnorth. These engines, including this particular one, have a certain celebrity status: Oliver the Western Engine appears in the children’s books written by the Rev W Awdry, and also in the Thomas the Tank Engine television series. As if that wasn’t fame enough, this very engine (1450) appeared in the film The Titfield Thunderbolt, albeit carrying a different number, and also in an episode of The Goodies

The locomotive pictured below – with another just visible through the gap – is currently resident on the SVR and was at one time certified for main line running. 34027 Taw Valley is a former Southern Region, West Country class express locomotive, which at one time worked some of the named expresses around the south and south-west of England – trains such as The Atlantic Coast Express which ran all the way to the Southern Region’s most westerly terminus (Bude).

By the time this picture was taken, I’d begun to fixate on the small ‘shed plates’ on the front of the locos, which identify their former home depots. Taw Valley carries shed plate 73B (Bricklayer’s arms): the depot, long gone, was formerly situated near to the intersection of a number of main roads, including – among others – Tower Bridge Road and Old Kent Road. It is now the site of residential and light industrial development.

Another shot taken in the Wyre Forest section of the line: Battle of Britain class 34081 – sometimes named 92 Squadron, but not on the day. This locomotive now spends its days touring the various heritage railways as a guest locomotive; in its heyday it would, like Taw Valley above, have operated across the old BR Southern region – anywhere between Kent and North Devon…

But there are drawbacks where steamers are concerned; one of them being the need for backwards running after visiting a terminus with no turntable. This is 34081 again, bum-end first this time and producing some very environmentally dubious emissions…

And that’s where diesels have a big advantage for the lineside snappers – they’re the same at both ends. Well, apart from the shunters…

Oh, and the Class 20s, obviously…

And, stretching a point, the Class 14s, where the cab isn’t quite symmetrically positioned, like this one waiting at Kidderminster on a previous visit…

The nuthatch below was a picture of studied indifference as the trains passed a few feet from where he was sat chatting to his mate…

And that was pretty much the day; we moved between the stations on foot, covered a few miles in the process (probably about 7 or 8 in total) and took advantage of the benches and shelter for food stops and to avoid the occasional outbreaks of drizzly rain.

Advertisements

Wyre Forest (14/03/17)

Being a weekday, not a school holiday, and still well away from the busy season, we’d decided to set aside our misanthropic tendencies and make our starting point the visitor centre. It was busier than we’d have anticipated, but only around the centre facilities; 200 yards into the forest and we were on our own. With skies more overcast than had been forecast, the birds seemed to be keeping a low profile and we were able to devote more of our attention to avoiding the still considerable amounts of mud underfoot; it’s a particular speciality of the Wyre Forest is mud.

There was, eventually, a lightening of the cloud cover, which roughly coincided with the thinning out of the trees; we became aware of a steady increase in both the amount of movement and the level of noise; woodland and hedgerow staples mostly on the day, although there is always the hope and possibility of something a little more exotic – a lesser spotted woodpecker perhaps, maybe even a goshawk. Not today, though.

A stone bridge spanning the route of the former railway line provides an excellent vantage point at those times when there is bird activity in the vicinity of the reserve’s premises at Lodge Hill Farm. On this occasion the movement in the trees turned out to be a pair of bullfinches; the pair quickly became three as a second female arrived on the scene, before two further arrivals swelled the numbers to five (two males/three females).

The male’s breast colouring was vivid even by bullfinch standards. Unfortunately, I’d upped the ISO setting on the camera – to allow for shooting at decent shutter speeds inside the woods – and then neglected to turn it back down; hence the over-exposure, particularly of the bright background.

The one sustained spell of warm sun, early in the afternoon, was sufficient to tempt out a female adder to bask among the leaf litter. As is often the case, there was no perfect unobstructed shot and we wanted to maintain a proper distance to avoid causing any disturbance to the adder.

There will hopefully be opportunities over the next few weeks to spot a few more, although nothing is guaranteed with something so elusive and sensitive to movement. Once those few weeks have passed and the undergrowth begins to seriously thicken out, the adders – along with the grass snakes which are also present – will become much more concealed and difficult to pick out.

When the adders decide to lie amongst the remnants of the previous year’s bracken, the similarities between their markings and the patterns of the dead undergrowth can make them very tricky to spot – particularly the females!

There isn’t one in the picture to the left, by the way – it’s just bracken.

Wood ants were already becoming active, developing existing nests and starting new ones. They obviously find conditions very much to their liking and anyone intending to take a break sitting on the ground needs to do a bit of reconnaissance before settling down. We’ve seen adders lying on top of some of the smaller ant nests; apparently they like the warmth generated by the activity in the nest and the ants don’t seem to bother them.

 

 

Just a few pictures…

Not many words to this post, just a handful of shots taken out and about with various hand-held devices…

Storm Doris uprooted a tree – A Scots pine, sadly – in the park, no more than about 80 yards from our front door. Not just any Scots pine either, although any loss is one too many; this was the tree where the female sparrowhawk used to sit – big, even for a female, and queen of all she surveyed. Recent work on the path around the pool may have destabilised the roots somewhat; if so, other pines in the same stand might be similarly at risk…

dsc_0001_edited-1

dsc_0004_edited-1

This run of attractive and cleverly woven fencing along a stretch of the Droitwich canal, utilising the trunks and branches from an established hedge; hazel, I think, although I’m no expert. I believe the weaving technique has a local name which, like so much these days, escapes me. Whatever it’s called, it looks nicer than chain-link and razor wire…

dscn1159

dscn1162

Last week in February and rhododendrons already in full bloom – or very close to it – Bunkers Hill Wood, right on the West Midlands/South Staffordshire border…

dsc_0012

dsc_0010

Hampton Loade station, Severn Valley Railway, and I’m reminded that, like it or not, I’m looking at a scene that – more years ago than I care to remember – I would have witnessed many times out on the main line: an old, first generation, diesel multiple unit, standing alongside a BR tank engine pulling coaching stock. Dudley Port low level, early sixties, heading for The Hawthorns to watch The Albion; who knows where the time goes?

dscn1183

And a carrion crow – plumage more blue-black and unblemished than any I can ever recall seeing…

dsc01101

The shot of the carrion crow was taken on my son’s Sony HX300 bridge camera, which easily outperforms my Nikon P510, although it is a bit bigger and heavier.